Stanford University Accepted Essays

Hi Tyler,

As a stressed sophomore in highschool who should be studying for her bio finals tomorrow, but instead decides to scroll incessantly down her WordPress out of procrastination (and maybe a twinge of hopefulness that she will finish reviewing soon coupled with some mysterious confidence in her ability to cram), I cannot begin to express the gratitude I have towards finding you, your blog, your youtube, and just you. (lol, I sound like a stalker .-.)

Far too many times, have Stanford “acceptees” write about how amazingly talented and “out of the world” they are, and they certainly are and certainly do deserve the admission ticket fair and square, but each time, I admit (hahaha no pun intended) feeling a little more scared than I was before clicking into that particular thread or page. I look up to them with respect and admiration because after all, it’s amazing people that build Stanford up and are built by Stanford, with hopes that I could be like them, and more motivation to try harder.

But it is you, and your writing, that brought to me, an image of a real person, of someone I would hang out with in a park to talk about life, to go on a light hike with, to draw and journal with, to write together about nothing in particular. It made me feel that Stanford was not a place just for genius scientists that discovered the elixir to never-aging when they’re 15, or for the champion of the world in British Parlimentary when they’re 17, or the high school junior who who already claims 59 patents, but that Stanford is also for passionate people who are willing to put themselves out there to not necessarily change the world, but at least run it, with endless love and burning passion. That, I think, sounds pretty legit.

Thanks for reading a supppeeerrrrr long comment and for sharing this~

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The point of this essay is to invoke the casual nature of roommate relationships and invite students to take a more relaxed approach to writing about themselves. It brings the application to life by asking you to write only about your own personality, which feels more open than other essays that ask you to answer a specific question like “Describe your community” or “Talk about a mentor who got you through a difficult time.” While answering both of those prompts still offers insight into who the author is, they are fundamentally centralized around another person or topic, which is why Stanford cuts straight to the chase with this prompt to actually get to know you better.

 

Stanford is looking for an extremely authentic 250-word portrayal of your character that could distinctly identify you from a crowd of essays. If you got to meet your admissions officer in person, and only had 60 seconds to pitch yourself without using anything from your activities or awards, what would you say first? If you were legitimately writing a letter to your roommate at Stanford, what would you want them to know about the prospect of living with you? If you imagine how your Stanford alumni interview might play out, what topics do you hope to steer towards?

 

Think deeply about these questions and first see if there is something meaningful that you want to convey, and look through Prompt 3 to see if it would best serve answering the question, “What matters to you, and why?” instead of this roommate prompt. If you do have a more serious answer, you can style the essay like a very formal letter or like a traditional 1-2 paragraph short essay without any of the letter gimmicks at all to stand out syntactically.

 

If you don’t think you have any important topics on the serious side that you want to specifically cover in the space for this prompt (an extreme medical condition, a family hardship etc.), you could also go for another popular tactic by creating a fun, miscellaneous essay.

 

This prompt can arguably be one of the most entertaining to write and read of all college supplemental essays because of the opportunity to present the admissions office with an amalgamation of weird topics. Last year’s CollegeVine guide encouraged students to explore their quirky side with this prompt by writing about unique hobbies or interesting personality oddities. It also advises staying away from things like politics (i.e., don’t indicate which party or ideology you tend to support, even through jokes or minor references, since you don’t want to step on any toes).

 

Don’t sweat too much over the exact way to put the essay in letter format. Starting with something like “Hi! I am ridiculously stoked to meet you!” or any other straightforward greeting that doesn’t sound too cheesy is totally fine. If you decide to, you can essentially make a bullet list of “fun me facts” if you want to include the maximum amount of content. Remember that this essay should be fun!

 

Since it is usually hard to come up with good material about your own diverse personality while staring at a blank computer screen, try keeping a note on your phone and adding to it gradually as you think of things throughout the day. Think about what you enjoy and jot down notes like:

I love Sandra Bullock movies. I wish I could stop biting my nails, and sometimes I do, but only until I take a test or watch a freaky movie. I hate doing my laundry and the song ‘Drops of Jupiter.’ I planned myself a Cutthroat Kitchen-themed birthday party last year because I love cooking contest shows. My favorite store is the Dollar Tree, and when I’m there I always feel like I’m getting too much stuff, but when I leave I regret putting stuff back. Before I go to bed, I like to watch clips from Ellen or Jimmy Fallon because I think it gives me funny dreams. I’m attracted to buying gift wrap even if I have no reason for it, a trait I inherited from my mom. I love chicken. I sleep like a rock and unfortunately, that means I need an incredibly loud alarm clock, but I also will never be bothered by late night noise, etc.

 

You can see by how long this section got just how easy it can be to talk about yourself once you get started…

 

Try to intersperse some facts that relate to activities you could do together or things that would be important for an actual roommate to know to stay true to the prompt. Juxtaposing random facts might not be the way to go if you feel they are redundant with your short answers or too all over the place for you. Putting together just a few key aspects of your personality and typical habits with more coherent elaboration on each and topping it off with a “Love, your future roomie” holds the potential to become an engaging essay as well.

 

Here is another example that shows a ton of personality and utilizes a list format:

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