Senior Skills English Homework Program Answers

Study Skills Guides

Struggling to be a successful student? Don't get discouraged, it isn't magic! But it does require desire, dedication and a lot of work. If you want learn how to become a successful student, then you've come to the right place. Our study skills guides for students will provide you everything you need in order to learn how to learn more effectively.

Active listening, reading comprehension, notetaking, stress management, time management, testing taking, and memorization are only a few of the topics addressed in our study skills guides for students. If you'll take the time to learn and apply the study skills concepts and principles taught in our guides you'll not only improve your performance in school but also your ability to learn in general -- and that will benefit you the rest of your life! Whether you're a freshman in college looking to get ahead, a teacher seeking study skills resources for your pupils, or a high school student just trying to survive, you'll find the study skills guides, tutorials, and resource you need right below.

To get started select a category link below.

Or scroll down to browse all our study skills resources and tutorials.

General Study Skills Guides

The following are general study skills guides, tutorials and articles for students, parents and teachers that offer proven tips and strategies for improving study skills habits, effectiveness and learning ability. Topics covered include time management, learning style, note taking, reading, math, vocabulary, writing, and listening, among others.

Test Taking Guides

Test taking is a skill in and of itself. Even some of the brightest students struggle when it comes to test taking. Learning how to take tests is an important aspect of educational performance, development and progression. Below we'll explore both general and specific tips and strategies for taking and enhancing performance on various types of tests, including short answer, multiple choice, essay, oral, openbook, and standardized.

Study Skills Resources by Subject

Understanding general, yet proven, strategies for studying and test taking is the first step to becoming an effective learner and student. However, each subject you study is unique and requires a slightly different learning approach. For example, learning how to do calculus is very different than studying American heritage. While both subjects require good study habits, effective listening, and reading comprehension skills, each requires a different approach to learning. Below we'll explore specific study skills and strategies as they relate to performance within individual subject areas.

New research suggests that a lot of assigned homework amounts to pointless busy work that doesn’t help students learn, while more thoughtful assignments can help them develop skills and acquire knowledge. How would you characterize the homework you get?

In the Sunday Review article “The Trouble With Homework,” Annie Murphy Paul reviews the research on homework:

The quantity of students’ homework is a lot less important than its quality. And evidence suggests that as of now, homework isn’t making the grade. Although surveys show that the amount of time our children spend on homework has risen over the last three decades, American students are mired in the middle of international academic rankings: 17th in reading, 23rd in science and 31st in math, according to results from the Program for International Student Assessment released last December.

In a 2008 survey, one-third of parents polled rated the quality of their children’s homework assignments as fair or poor, and 4 in 10 said they believed that some or a great deal of homework was busywork. A new study, coming in the Economics of Education Review, reports that homework in science, English and history has “little to no impact” on student test scores. (The authors did note a positive effect for math homework.) Enriching children’s classroom learning requires making homework not shorter or longer, but smarter.

She goes on to enumerate some of the aspects of effective independent assignments, like “retrieval practice,” which basically means doing practice tests to reinforce learning and commit it to memory, and “interleaving,” in which problems are not grouped into sets by type, but rather scattered throughout an assignment, which makes the brain work harder to grasp the material.

Students: Tell us how effective you think your homework is. What kinds of assignments seem pointless? Which ones are confusing or frustrating? Which ones are most engaging and interesting? Which ones are you fairly sure help you learn and grow?


Students 13 and older are invited to comment below. Please use only your first name. For privacy policy reasons, we will not publish student comments that include a last name.

Questions about issues in the news for students 13 and older.

One thought on “Senior Skills English Homework Program Answers

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *